Sunday, December 15, 2013

Providing Library Instruction to Distance Learning Students in the Twenty-First Century: Meeting the Current and Changing Needs of a Diverse Community

This study examines the variety of instructional practices employed in distance learning librarianship from the end of the Twentieth Century through the early beginnings of the Twenty-First Century. The authors provide a rough review of the literature on distance learning library instruction, and the study highlights the instructional services provided at two academic institutions with distinctly different clienteles and missions—one a large American university and the other a large Caribbean university.


Cite:

Providing Library Instruction to Distance Learning Students in the 21st Century / Evadne McLean, Stephen H. Dew / Journal of Library Administration  / Vol. 45 / Iss. 3-4 / 315-337/ 2006.

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/uncg/f/S_Dew_Providing_081208.pdf]

Monday, December 9, 2013

Dynamic Distance: Online Promotion Tools for Libraries Serving Virtual Learners

  • Abstract 

  • The Marden Education Centre Library and the SIDE Resources Centre are developing strategies using online technologies to provide a dynamic library service to a range of learners, many of whom are geographically isolated. Through the use of web-based tools such as learning management systems, online classrooms and Web 2.0 applications, teacher librarians in distance learning settings work to promote the library and its services to a range of clients to develop student literacy and information literacy. These technologies create opportunities for personal contact and to enable students to work collaboratively with their peers. This paper provides practical examples of the authors' work. [Author abstract]

  • Cite: 

  • Dynamic distance : online promotion tools for libraries serving virtual learners . Johnston, S; Scott, C .Hearts on fire : sharing the passion : ASLA XX Biennial Conference Proceedings 2007 : held in Adelaide, South Australia, Australia 2-5 October 2007.

Source Available At:

Application of Social Media in Marketing of Library and Information Services: A Case Study from Pakistan

Webology is Open Access - freely available for you to read, print, download, use, distribute, cite, and link.
Abstract

The paper aims to explore different applications of social media for marketing of library and information resources and services. It investigates the respondent's attitude towards the usefulness of social media in marketing of library. A survey research method was administered by using a peer-reviewed and pilot-tested questionnaire. Data were collected from librarians and LIS school academicians working at Bahauddin Zakariya University of Multan and the Islamia University of Bahawalpur. Findings showed that respondent's attitude was positive; majority agreed that the use of social media is important to capture the attention of online users and helps in distance learning and knowledge sharing. Respondents recommended the use of Facebook, Wikis, LinkedIn, Blogging, YouTube and online groups for marketing different library services. They indicated that inadequate training opportunities, lack of knowledge, privacy and identity theft, slow speed of internet and electricity failure are the problems for applying social media in libraries of Pakistan for marketing library resources and services. They demanded for trainings for social media usage and suggested that libraries should develop social media page for maximum exploitation of library services. Study recommends that libraries should develop their marketing plan for utilizing social media for news and service alerts and quick updates to online users and fund raising.

[snip]

Conclusion

It is plausible that respondent's behavior towards the use of social media for marketing library resources and services was positive. By using social media libraries can promote their users, services, resources, events and communication. Study concludes that according to the changing needs of library users, libraries need to be changed accordingly. Libraries should be facilitated with internet service and develop their web page and social media page. In order to grow social media usage trend in libraries of Pakistan, librarians should be trained and educated regarding social media use for marketing library resources and services and all the problems that hinder in social media usage in libraries should be resolved.

Cite:

Khan, Shakeel Ahmad, & Bhatti, Rubina (2012).   "Application of social media in marketing of library and information services: A case study from Pakistan."   Webology, 9(1), Article 93.

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://www.webology.org/2012/v9n1/a93.html]


Sunday, December 8, 2013

Library-Led Faculty Workshops: Helping Distance Educators Meet Information Literacy Goals in the Online Classroom

Abstract 

Library-Led Faculty Workshops: Helping Distance Educators Meet Information Literacy Goals in the Online ClassroomAt University of Maryland University College (UMUC), librarians have designed and led a number of multiday, asynchronous online workshops for faculty. The workshops teach faculty how to meet information literacy goals in the virtual classroom. Through hands-on activities and discussion among their colleagues, participants in the faculty workshops learn about the university's information literacy standards, library resources and services, free Web tools, and how best to design class assignments involving library research. Library-led faculty workshops at UMUC have increased library visibility and furthered collaboration between faculty and librarians. This article discusses 5 workshops, detailing workshop content and logistics and demonstrating how librarians can help distance faculty further information literacy goals for students.

[snip]

Conclusion

Library-led faculty workshops offer excellent opportunities to further a library's collaboration with individual faculty members, academic departments, and other units within the university. Workshops that raise distance educators’ awareness of a library's online resources and services, and that help faculty create classroom assignments that make the best use of those resources and services, ultimately help the university reach its information literacy goals for students.

Though designing and facilitating a workshop represents a significant time commitment on the part of the library, each workshop, once created, can be presented multiple times. The workshops, however, do not remain static: librarians update content as needed and make revisions to further enhance the participants’ experience in the workshops. Furthermore, an existing workshop can readily be adapted to another topic: for example, a workshop on information literacy in the natural sciences can be adapted to one on information literacy in psychology. With even a few successful workshops in place, a library can envision addressing any number of information-literacy related topics in faculty workshops.

Being able to offer workshops, as the UMUC library does, in partnership with a department like the Center for Teaching and Learning, gives library-led workshops a certain visibility and importance. However, smaller-scale, less formal library-led workshops, offered directly to an academic department, for example, or to interested university staff, can also be an effective means of outreach and building partnerships between a distance library and other entities within the university

Cite:

Library-Led Faculty Workshops: Helping Distance Educators Meet Information Literacy Goals in the Online Classroom Robert Miller, Edward O’Donnell, Neal Pomea, Joseph Rawson, Ryan Shepard, Cynthia Thomes /  Journal of Library Administration  / Vol. 50, Iss. 7-8 / 830-856/  2010

Source and (Free) Full Text Available At:

[http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01930826.2010.488977]

Presentation Available At:

[http://cdm16240.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15434coll5/id/1025/rec/14]

Educating the Educators: Outreach to the College of Education Distance Faculty and Native American Students

Abstract
Educating the EducatorsOutreach to the College of Education Distance Faculty and Native American Students
The focus of “Educating the Educators: Outreach to the College of Education Distance Faculty and Native American Students” is to examine and explore the relationship between the Library and the College of Education regarding provision and promotion of Library services to students and faculty taking and teaching classes virtually and at satellite campus and computer lab locations throughout the state. It will include an overview of the special challenges facing the Library in providing these services to a college that offers a large number of distance education classes, enrolls a large number of Native American students, and includes a majority of the institution's distance students and parttime distance faculty.

Cite: 

Educating the Educators: Outreach to the College of Education Distance Faculty and Native American Students /  Tina M. Adams, R. Sean Evans  /  Journal of Library Administration  / Vol. 41 /  Iss. 1-2 / 3-18 / 2004

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://gcls2.cmich.edu/conference/past_proceedings/11thOCLSCP.pdf]


Providing Off-Campus Library Services by “Team”: An Assessment

Abstract
Providing Off-Campus Library Services by “Team”An AssessmentIn contrast to many large academic libraries, Kansas State University (K-State) does not have a distance librarian. As a result, the Library Services Project Team (Team) was formed to take a fresh look at current library services for distance learners. Although the Team has been in place for over two years, and has implemented many changes, there was no mechanism for receiving formal feedback from students and faculty about these services. Because it is important to know whether services are being used, two librarians on the Team developed a Web-based survey targeted at distance faculty and students. This paper discusses the assessment project including development of the survey, the university approval process, use of an electronic in-house survey system, administration of the survey, and compilation and analysis of results.

Cite:

Marcia Stockham & Elizabeth Turtle (2004) Providing Off-Campus Library Services by “Team”, Journal of Library Administration, 41:3-4, 443-457

Source:

[http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1300/J111v41n03_09]

[No Known Open Access Version Available]

Thursday, December 5, 2013

Distance Education and Virtual Reference

Abstract

Texas A&M University Libraries has been testing virtual reference services since February 2004, but during the fall semester 2005, the Libraries began implementing and actively promoting the services to various target groups. Distance education students were identified as a primary target group for virtual reference services, and as of the fall semester 2005, approximately 1,600 students were enrolled in 190 distance education classes. This paper presents the Libraries plan for promoting virtual reference services to distance education students and faculty and for evaluating the plan.

[snip]

Conclusion

The Texas A&M University Libraries experience provides evidence that the implementation of an organized, cohesive marketing strategy can have a positive effect on the promotion of library services. But it also demonstrates the need for more systematic and quantitative analysis of the impact of marketing strategies. In particular, this study poses questions for further research: When should a marketing blitz take place? Should faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates be targeted at the same time or at staggered times throughout the academic year? Should a marketing campaign be repeated? How often? Long-term evaluation of user statistics is certain to offer more insight into the process of marketing library services.

Cite:

Distance Education and Virtual Reference / Karen I. MacDonald, Wyoma Vanduinkerken
Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning / Vol. 2, Iss. 4, 2006

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1030&context=univ_lib_facpub]

Saturday, November 30, 2013

Best Practices for Librarians Embedded in Online Courses

Abstract: 

Academic librarians interested in collaborating with faculty in online courses often express questions about their role, level of involvement, and activities. This article provides a list of best practices to guide those developing embedded librarian services. The practices are drawn from a review of the literature, as case study of one embedded librarian's experiences, and a mixed methods study of embedded librarianship at six institutions. The resulting best practices will help embedded librarians collaborate effectively with faculty to create a positive learning experience for distance students.

Cite:

Hoffman, Starr & Ramin, Lilly. Best Practices for Librarians Embedded in Online Courses. [New York, New York]. UNT Digital Library. http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67620/. Accessed November 30, 2013.

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67620/m2/1/high_res_d/BestPracticesEmbeddedLibrarians_article.pdf]

Embedded Academic Librarian Experiences in Online Courses: Roles, Faculty Collaboration, and Opinion



Abstract:

Purpose – This paper seeks to determine common and unique activities, promotional methods, time management strategies, and best practices of academic librarians embedded in online courses at six institutions.

Journal cover: Library ManagementDesign/methodology/approach – This is a mixed methods study using both interviews and quantitative data to study the activities and experiences of embedded librarians at six institutions.

Findings – The librarians and faculty involved in the embedded services reported unexpected benefits to the service. However, experiences with managing the time required for embedding along with regular reference duties varied, and scaling up the service from a few courses to a regular library service caused staffing issues for a few institutions.

Research limitations/implications – This study was exploratory by nature and thus its scope was limited. Because only six institutions were studied, it is difficult to determine the true state of embedded librarianship in the USA. Future research should build on the foundation to determine outcomes for which embedded service is best suited and perform cost-benefit analyses.

Practical implications – Because embedded services can become popular quickly, individual librarians should work with library administrators to determine whether staffing a full-scale service will be possible and plan accordingly. If a full-scale service is not feasible, the service scope may need to be limited (for instance, to core courses or to specific academic departments).

Originality/value – Past research on embedded librarianship has been limited to single institutions or to purposes and outcomes of the service. This paper provides a comparative study of embedded librarians at six institutions, and concentrates on the librarian's experience at each.

Cite:

Starr Hoffman, (2011) "Embedded academic librarian experiences in online courses: Roles, faculty collaboration, and opinion", Library Management, Vol. 32 Iss: 6/7, pp.444 - 456

Source

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1939464

[No Known Open Access Version Available]

Friday, November 29, 2013

At A Distance: Fostering Library as a Place for Distance Students: Best Practices From Two Universities

Abstract: 

The concept of library as a place is now in action in many academic libraries: from physical library spaces to Web presences. In the constantly growing market of online and distance learning, however, libraries must foster library as a place for students who may never set foot in the physical building. This article provides a profile of two universities serving two very different bodies of distance students as well as the challenges associated with these populations. These libraries work to provide services to distance students that cultivate the library as a place to go for learning, research, and support by focusing on six categories: access, environment,
resources, instruction, availability at the point of need, and “being real.” Tangible examples and best practices are provided throughout. This article is based on a presentation given at the 15th National Conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries in Philadelphia in March 2011.

[snip]

Conclusion:

By focusing on the needs of students at distance and maximizing options in the six categories
discussed, NU and UNCG are fostering library as a place for distance students. The authors
believe that readers who explore the categories presented will find among them some ideas that
will help them implement ways to effectively foster at their own institutions the “library as a
place” for their online students.

Cite:

Bryna Coonin , Beth Filar Williams & Heidi Steiner (2011) Fostering Library as a Place for Distance Students: Best Practices From Two Universities, Internet Reference Services
Quarterly, 16:4, 149-158, DOI: 10.1080/10875301.2012.618796

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Distance Education and Virtual Reference: Implementing a Marketing Plan at Texas A&M University

Abstract

Texas A&M University Libraries has been testing virtual reference services since February 2004, but during the fall semester 2005, the Libraries began implementing and actively promoting the services to various target groups. Distance education students were identified as a primary target group for virtual reference services, and as of the fall semester 2005, approximately 1,600 students were enrolled in 190 distance education classes. This paper presents the Libraries plan for promoting virtual reference services to distance education students and faculty and for evaluating the plan.

[snip]

Conclusion

The Texas A&M University Libraries experience provides evidence that the implementation of an organized, cohesive marketing strategy can have a positive effect on the promotion of library services. But it also demonstrates the need for more systematic and quantitative analysis of the impact of marketing strategies. In particular, this study poses questions for further research: When should a marketing blitz take place? Should faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates be targeted at the same time or at staggered times throughout the academic year? Should a marketing campaign be repeated? How often? Long-term evaluation of user statistics is certain to offer more insight into the process of marketing library services.

Cite:

Distance Education and Virtual Reference / Karen I. MacDonald, Wyoma Vanduinkerken
Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning / Vol. 2/  Iss. 4 / 29-40 / 2006

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1030&context=univ_lib_facpub]

Sunday, November 24, 2013

The Library of the University of South Africa’s Marketing Voyage of Discovery Through Conventional Marketing Channels and the Internet

This paper describes the experiences with marketing, a new concept at the Library at the University of South Africa (Unisa), which is the largest university in South Africa and one of the largest distance education institutions in the world. Following a discussion of marketing of the tertiary library and the service marketing triangle (organization and staff; market and organization; and the traditional marketing mix of product, price, place, and promotion), the marketing plan of the Unisa Library is described. Highlights include: target markets identified; the communication strategy; use of conventional communication channels and Web marketing; and Web marketing tools, including gateway advertising, product information and recommendation, establishing customer discussion panels and creating a dialogue, targeting specific demographic groups, evaluating gateway success, pricing, getting listed in directories, joining industry hubsites, e-commerce, and internal marketing. (AEF)

Cite: Paper presented at the IATUL Conference The Future of Libraries in Human Communication, Technical University of Crete, Chania, Greece, 17th May - 21st May, 1999.

Source and Full Text Available At:

dehub: Distance and Online Learning Network

dehub operates under the sponsorship of the University of New England (UNE, located in Armidale, NSW, Australia) as a research initiative specializing in promotion of scholarship for innovation in online and distance learning (ODL). Since its establishment, dehub has strived to be a research and networking centre, connecting different stakeholders, with the aim of promoting and supporting collaboration in ODL research, innovation and other initiatives in education and lifelong learning. dehub’s aim is to inform and influence policy and improve practice in online and distance education based on evidence from national and international research outcomes.

dehub nurtures scholarship in ODL by

  • promoting research activity and outcomes to influence practice and inform decision-making, strategic directions and policy trends
  • evaluating and researching all aspects of e-learning, including policies and legislative frameworks, educational systems and software, quality assurance mechanisms, learner/teacher experiences and practices, and theoretical and pedagogical considerations
  • providing resources and services to support ODE educators
  • maintaining a global network of ODE scholars and other stakeholders

Under a grant from the Diversity and Structural Adjustment Fund awarded to the UNE through the Australian Government Department of industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (DIISRTE), the DEHub Project originally established a distance education hub in late 2008. In that project (which finished in March 2013), UNE partnered with CQUniversity (CQU), the University of Southern Queensland (USQ), Charles Sturt University (CSU) and Massey University in selected research activities, forming a consortium of Australia and New Zealand’s largest and leading distance education providers.

Source and Links Available At:

[http://www.dehub.edu.au/]

Collaboration Between Distance Education Faculty and the Library: One Size Does Not Fit All

Abstract

At a university with no centrally administered distance education (DE) program, the library is faced with the challenge of not only identifying but also supporting a rapidly increasing number of disparate DE initiatives. In this environment, a one-size-fits-all approach to inviting and encouraging faculty collaboration in the integration of library research into the DE curriculum was not sufficient. This presentation will discuss various methods used at one university to increase the level of collaboration between the library and distance education (DE) faculty.

Conclusion 

Which of the many approaches to collaboration discussed here worked and which ones didn’t? The  answer would have to be that all worked to some extent and yet no single approach was the silver bullet that would ensure a holistically collaborative effort between the DE librarian and faculty member. Development of collaborative endeavors is incremental, and like any solid relationship must be built one step at a time, taking into consideration the needs and interests of all in librarian continues with the marketing, networking and collaborative efforts described herein. The instructional design team, including the librarian, has plans for strengthening collaborative efforts. Such plans include the development of a “toolbox” for faculty teaching online, which best practices, samples of assignments integrating library research, FAQs, and testimonials from other online instructors. Successful collaborative efforts with one faculty member can serve as examples for others. Heller-Ross suggested that “establishing a partnership with one faculty member for one course can also an effective way to create an environment in which library services can become integrated in  distance learning programs. This serves to highlight the possibilities and showcase them a Partnership section ¶ 2). As faculty members become more comfortable and environment, they are able to shift their focus from daunting technical matters to other ways in which they can finesse and improve the online teaching experience. When their immediate and urgent needs have been met, faculty members can address what matters most to them, and to us: better educating students. And when the times comes, continued nurturing of our relationship with faculty members will ensure that the library will be clearly in their sights.

Cite: 

Jill S. Markgraf (2002) Collaboration Between Distance Education Faculty and the Library, Journal of Library Administration, 37:3-4, 451-464, DOI:10.1300/J111v37n03_37 

Source and Full Available At:

[http://gcls2.cmich.edu/conference/past_proceedings/10THOCLSCP.pdf]

Saturday, November 23, 2013

Can You Hear Me Now? Communicating Library Services to Distance Education Students and Faculty

Conclusion

The ACRL Guidelines for Distance Learning Library Services (2000) assert "access to adequate library services and resources is essential for the attainment of superior academic skills in post-secondary education, regardless of where students, faculty, and programs are located." A basic menu of library resources and services for distance users includes remote access to databases, e-books, e-reserves, e-reference, and interlibrary loan tailored for remote users. A user-focused approach, providing instruction and guidance in resource use, distinguishes some institutions for remote students. The needs of distance education faculty are rarely addressed.

The results of this research reinforce the fact that although library services and resources are essential to an effective distance education program, simply providing access is insufficient. Communicating access through web design and the marketing of available services and resources is suggested for successful use. Although the size and type of institution may have an impact on the number of resources and services offered to remote users, these parameters would seem to have little bearing on the effective communication of available library services. A distance education or off-campus gateway should be prominently featured on the library's home page and should be designed to respond to the needs of users, even if information seems repetitive or obvious to library staff. A good test of gateway effectiveness is the attempt to identify and answer common user questions, which may reveal gaps in understanding. The following elements could be considered essential for the library distance education gateway: library contact information, personalized where possible; listings of remote access databases and e-books with some guidance for their use and information on authorization as appropriate; some electronic means of posing reference questions; and specific instructions for off-campus interlibrary loan procedures. Desirable information would include subject or course-specific resource pages and information for distance education faculty.

Cite:  Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, Volume VIII, Number II, Summer 2005

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/summer82/nicholas82.htm]

Friday, November 22, 2013

We Cannot See Them, But They Are There: Marketing Library Services for Distance Learners.

Abstract

Distance learners are a unique target-population for the marketing of library services and resources. Because these patrons do not visit the library often, if at all, it is crucial to actively promote the library resources and services available to them. Marketing strategies for distance learning library services need to take a multifaceted approach to reach distance learners in as many ways as possible, and collaboration with various groups and departments on campus is an important part of the process. Promotion of distance library services can take advantage of high-tech options, but it should also work in the realm of “traditional” publicity as well.

Cite: 

Dermody, Melinda We Cannot See Them, but They Are There: Marketing Library Services for Distance Learners. Journal of Library & Information Services In Distance Learning, v2 n1 p41-50 2005.

Source and Full Text Available At 

[http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J192v02n01_04#.UpAFxNJwqSo]

No Know Open Access Source Available

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Got Distance Services? Marketing Remote Library Services to Distance Learners

SUMMARY
Distance learning students may not think of the “campus” library as the first place to fulfill their information needs and may not even be aware of the services available to them. One way to reach these students is to adopt and adapt marketing techniques from the business world. This article examines the findings of a survey conducted at Emporia State University concerning the awareness of distance learning services. It will also examine marketing techniques and illustrate how they can be applied to increase awareness of reference support services for distance learners.

Cite: 

Fisk, James, Terri Pedersen Summey. "Got Distance Services? Marketing Remote Library Services to Distance Learners." Internet Reference Services Quarterly 9,no. 1/2 (2005): 77-91.

Source and Select Full Text Available At:

Google Books

Subscription or Pay-Per-View 

[http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J136v09n01_07]

Challenges of Connecting Off-Campus Agricultural Science Users with Library Services

ABSTRACT
In 2005, the University of Florida (UF) Libraries created a new position, the Outreach Librarian for Agricultural Sciences, whose primary purpose is to enhance library services to the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) off-campus community. As of Spring 2006, IFAS includes more than 995 faculty and staff located at 13 different Research and Education Centers (RECs) and 67 County Extension offices throughout the State of Florida and more than 240 distance learning students from all over the world. Providing library services to IFAS is complicated, considering the distance from the main campus, the various levels of research, the wide range of subject expertise required by users, and the separation into three distinct functions-research, education and extension. In recent years many of the UF services and resources important to off-campus users—such as Interlibrary Loan, virtual reference, instruction services, and electronic resources—have dramatically improved, and yet a lack of awareness for these services and a feeling of unhappiness persists. Furthermore, competition from resources like Google Scholar makes building awareness of library services a top priority. This paper covers the various steps taken, and challenges met, to generate awareness of available library resources and services.

Cite: Valrie Davis (2007) Challenges of Connecting Off-Campus Agricultural Science Users with Library Services, Journal of Agricultural & Food Information, 8:2, 39-47, DOI: 10.1300/J108v08n02_05

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00000112/00001/13j]

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Marketing Research Relationships to Promote Online Student Success


Abstract
Many creative and unique plans for serving the distance learning population are being designed to stay in compliance with the ACRL Guidelines for Distance Learning Library Services (2004). These guidelines promote providing services for the distance learning community that are equivalent to those provided for students and faculty located in a traditional campus setting. The guidelines also acknowledge that designing services for this population may result in a more personalized approach than the campus community might expect. This paper will examine the application of relationship marketing, defined as mutual interest between companies and customers that emphasizes customer retention and long term relationships, to the design of library services for distance learners.

Cite: “Marketing Research Relationships to Promote Online Student Success.”Lillard, Linda L. Co-published simultaneously in Journal of Library Administration (The Haworth Information Press, an imprint of The Haworth Press, Inc.) Vol. 45, No. 1/2, 2006, pp. 267-277; and: The Twelfth Off-Campus Library Services Conference Proceedings (ed: Julie A. Garrison) The Haworth Information Press, an imprint of The Haworth Press, Inc., 2006, pp. 267-277.

Monday, November 11, 2013

Marketing Electronic Resources to Distance Students: A Multipronged Approach



SUMMARY

In marketing electronic resources to distance students, librarians are seeking to do more than promote high usage levels for scholarly resources. Marketing requires the best mix of resources to match student needs. Distance students want these resources to be easily accessible any time/anywhere and to provide full-text online material. Students should be supported through being alerted to relevant resources and provided with help in using them. This chapter argues that effective promotion is multipronged and will be most effective if it includes direct e-mail, a well-designed Web site, work with faculty to embed a staged approach to developing students' knowledge of resources, and quality advice to students who seek it at their point of need.

[snip]

Conclusion 

To market electronic resources effectively to distance students, we need to ensure that we have relevant quality full text online resources which are easily located and accessed. Our promotion should enhance awareness of what is available and its value to users. Advertising must be timed to attract attention when students have a need and this is primarily when assignment or other research is occurring. Long term take up will be greater if initial experiences are positive. It will also be greater where students have a clear need to use the library resources: a need which faculty can create by their assessment strategies.

Effective promotion is likely to be multipronged. Direct e-mail is the most economical way to reach most distance students. Also effective is providing information where students sign into their online units or within their unit information, particularly when it is tailored and highly relevant to their immediate needs. A well designed website is essential. Working in partnership with faculty to embed a staged approach to exposingstudents to resources is highly recommended. Finally, providing quality advice to students who approach the library for help will build good relationships and encourage return visits to electronic resources.

Cite: Marketing Electronic Resources to Distance Students /  Julia Leong /  The Serials Librarian /  Vol. 53, Iss. 3, 2007 / 77-93.

[http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J123v53n03_06]

Preprint Available At:

[http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/eserv/rmit:8675/l2006020413.pdf]

Marketing Library Resources and Services to Distance Faculty

Abstract
As academic libraries and librarians experience an increasingly complex higher education environment, it is essential to market library resources and services effectively. One component of a library’s marketing plan for distance learners can be an assessment of the needs of distance faculty. Teaching faculty are influential in affecting student perceptions and their use of the library. This paper reports on an assessment of the needs of faculty who teach classes in distance graduate degree programs. Results from the survey provide strategic direction for delivering and marketing services to distance learners and distance faculty.

Cite:
Co-published simultaneously in Journal of Library Administration (The Haworth Information Press, an imprint of The Haworth Press, Inc.) Vol. 31, No. 3/4, 2001, pp. 5-22; and: Off-Campus Library Services (ed: Anne Marie Casey) The Haworth Information Press, an imprint of The Haworth Press, Inc., 2001, pp. 5-22.

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libraryscience/77/]

Communication of Community College Library Promotion to Distance Learners: ...


Abstract

Distance learners' lack of knowledge about available library resources and services is the research problem addressed in this study. It is significant to Library and Information Studies because library professionals are called upon to consider and examine their methods and practices of how they create a presence among their distance learners. This signals librarians to make adjustments to bridge the gap between what is available and students' actual use of the library. This research sought to find out how community college libraries might establish a presence among new distance education students that would result in their greater use of library resources and services. How librarians feel they achieve library promotion to distance education students and the extent to which promotion is carried out for the purpose of reaching those students are the focus of this study. Information is provided concerning how community college libraries can promote themselves among new distance learners via means that may positively impact use of library resources and services.

[snip]

As a result of the findings, it may be concluded that the majority of libraries in the study use more than one means of creating initial communications between the library and distance learners and that growth has also occurred in the use of library resources and services among distance education students. Data indicate that promoted benefits that correspond with the promoted product also positively impact consumption of the product, in that the benefit is of a utilitarian or a hedonic nature in regard to consumer needs. Those libraries that used only one means of promotion or none at all, experienced usage losses, no growth, or very little growth. The telephone interviews revealed that while libraries are incorporating innovatively proactive means of reaching and serving distance learners, more planning, initiatives, and library awareness assessments are needed for furthering the presence of the library among distance learners. Such efforts could prove to increase library usage and student productivity.

Cite: Austin, Sandra. "Communication of Community College Library Promotion to Distance Learners: Librarians' Practices and Perceptions as Determined Via e-Surveys and Telephone Interviews." Order No. 3347054, Texas Woman's University, 2008, http://search.proquest.com/docview/304317815?accountid=10906 (accessed November 11, 2013).

Google Books


If You Build It, Will They Come? Creating a Marketing Plan for Distance Learning Library Services

SUMMARY. As distance education programs continue to grow, so do the services offered by libraries to the communities created by such programs. However, for these programs to be successful, the people that they are intended to serve need to be aware of the support and services available to them. Without such awareness, the services will go unused. Through a survey, the librarians at Emporia State University learned that making distant students aware of services was essential to the success of distance learning library services. Librarians discovered that creating a marketing plan to guide the marketing process was essential. This tool serves as a road map to visually illustrate the path from the conception of ideas to the realization of the marketing goals and objectives. This paperexamines the process of writing a marketing plan and intends to illustratehow it can assist the library in marketing its services to a distant population.

[snip]

[Conclusion]: In the past, libraries have not taken a very proactive stance with regards to marketing themselves and their services. In our current technological age, when inventions such as the World Wide Web compete with the library as providers of information, the library needs to take a more active role in making people aware of what they have to offer to customers. This is especially true of the distance learning communities that are increasing in numbers at most colleges and universities. The remote population is especially hard to reach because they are not physically present in the library. To contact this population, the library should develop “brand identity” or a look and feel that is accessible online. In order to conduct a successful marketing campaign, the marketing plan is an essential piece. It allows library personnel to look at the “big picture”and assists in the visualization of what the library would like to accomplish. Creating a plan can help stimulate thinking and make better use oflimited resources. It assists with organizing the campaign and the assignment of tasks, responsibilities and deadlines. Finally, it serves as a road map leading the library from the inception of the plan to the accomplishment of the goals and objectives (Cohen, 2001).

Cite:  “If You Build It, Will They Come? Creating a Marketing Plan for Distance Learning Library Services.” Summey, Terri Pedersen. Co-published simultaneously in Journal of Library Administration (The Haworth Information Press, an imprint of The Haworth Press, Inc.) Vol. 41, No. 3/4, 2004, pp. 459-470; and: The Eleventh Off-Campus Library Services Conference Proceedings (ed: Patrick B. Mahoney) The Haworth Information Press, an imprint of The Haworth Press, Inc., 2004, pp. 459-470.

Site: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J111v41n03_10 [No Known Open Access Option]

Sunday, November 10, 2013

Student Library Advocacy Programs


The Student Library Advocacy blog is devoted to documenting initiatives in which students are directly or indirectly involved in promoting library collections, events, services, etc. to fellow students, as well as to faculty, and/or staff.


In tradition to promoting library resources and services to on-campus students, faculty, and/or staff, student library advocates can also promote them to distant learners.

Friday, November 8, 2013

We Built It, Why Didn’t They Come? An Analysis of Library Awareness and Usage In the Kansas

 [Introduction]

The Association of College and Research Libraries’ Standards for Distance Learning Library Services (2008) specifies that libraries should “regularly [survey] distance learning library users to monitor and assess both the appropriateness of their use of services and resources and the degree to which needs are being met and skills acquired.” Although the standards do not define the term “regularly,” their stated goal of ensuring that academic libraries meet the research and information needs of distance learners leaves little doubt that it is appropriate to conduct a survey whenever librarians charged with meeting the needs of distance learners are ignorant of those needs, as occurred at Kansas State University Libraries (KSUL) following a structural reorganization which took place in 2010.

In May 2011, KSUL’s Instructional Design Librarian established a Distance Learning Team (hereafter referred to as we) comprised of representatives from KSUL’s two largest public services departments: Faculty and Graduate Services (FGS) and Undergraduate and Community Services (UCS). Although we were anxious to begin improving services and marketing efforts, we decided to minimize the likelihood of solving non-existent problems by heeding the Standards’ call for a user survey. This paper describes the survey’s goals and items, presents key results (including the development of the survey instrument as an educational tool), outlines some of the changes we subsequently initiated to bolster services and marketing, and discusses our plans for future service improvements and assessments

[snip]

Our surveys and those conducted eight years earlier by Stockham and Turtle both demonstrate quite clearly that services and resources do not promote themselves. They also reveal that many distance learners, faculty, and instructors either do not endeavor to find out what libraries can do for them, or are unsuccessful in the attempt. If you build it, there is no guarantee that they will come, even if it is incredible. While promotion and marketing might entice more of them to come, the much better strategy is to rethink the dynamics of the situation. Education involves much more than communicating facts, teaching skills, and introducing theoretical frameworks. It also requires challenges that create new needs and new motivations to explore, and the creation of environments to meet those needs. The environments should have entrances throughout the landscape, on libraries’ pages, in online classes, in syllabi, and interwoven into the structure of assignments.They will come if they know it exists and expect it will help.

Cite: Pitts, J., Bonella, L., & Coleman, J. (2012). We built it, why didn't they come? An analysis of library awareness and usage in the Kansas State University distance learning community. In F. Baudino & C. Johnson (Eds.), Brick and Click Libraries: An Academic Library Symposium, Northwest Missouri State University, Friday, October 26,  2012 (pp. 141-151). Maryville, MO: Northwest Missouri State University.


Thanks to Joelle Pitts !!!

Promo Code: Strategies for Promoting Library Resources and Services To Distant Learners Launched


Promo Code was formally launched today, Friday, November 8 2013.

Promo Code is devoted to documenting initiatives, projects, and research relating the variety of effective strategies for promoting library resources and services to distant learners.