Sunday, December 15, 2013

Providing Library Instruction to Distance Learning Students in the Twenty-First Century: Meeting the Current and Changing Needs of a Diverse Community

This study examines the variety of instructional practices employed in distance learning librarianship from the end of the Twentieth Century through the early beginnings of the Twenty-First Century. The authors provide a rough review of the literature on distance learning library instruction, and the study highlights the instructional services provided at two academic institutions with distinctly different clienteles and missions—one a large American university and the other a large Caribbean university.


Cite:

Providing Library Instruction to Distance Learning Students in the 21st Century / Evadne McLean, Stephen H. Dew / Journal of Library Administration  / Vol. 45 / Iss. 3-4 / 315-337/ 2006.

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/uncg/f/S_Dew_Providing_081208.pdf]

Monday, December 9, 2013

Dynamic Distance: Online Promotion Tools for Libraries Serving Virtual Learners

  • Abstract 

  • The Marden Education Centre Library and the SIDE Resources Centre are developing strategies using online technologies to provide a dynamic library service to a range of learners, many of whom are geographically isolated. Through the use of web-based tools such as learning management systems, online classrooms and Web 2.0 applications, teacher librarians in distance learning settings work to promote the library and its services to a range of clients to develop student literacy and information literacy. These technologies create opportunities for personal contact and to enable students to work collaboratively with their peers. This paper provides practical examples of the authors' work. [Author abstract]

  • Cite: 

  • Dynamic distance : online promotion tools for libraries serving virtual learners . Johnston, S; Scott, C .Hearts on fire : sharing the passion : ASLA XX Biennial Conference Proceedings 2007 : held in Adelaide, South Australia, Australia 2-5 October 2007.

Source Available At:

Application of Social Media in Marketing of Library and Information Services: A Case Study from Pakistan

Webology is Open Access - freely available for you to read, print, download, use, distribute, cite, and link.
Abstract

The paper aims to explore different applications of social media for marketing of library and information resources and services. It investigates the respondent's attitude towards the usefulness of social media in marketing of library. A survey research method was administered by using a peer-reviewed and pilot-tested questionnaire. Data were collected from librarians and LIS school academicians working at Bahauddin Zakariya University of Multan and the Islamia University of Bahawalpur. Findings showed that respondent's attitude was positive; majority agreed that the use of social media is important to capture the attention of online users and helps in distance learning and knowledge sharing. Respondents recommended the use of Facebook, Wikis, LinkedIn, Blogging, YouTube and online groups for marketing different library services. They indicated that inadequate training opportunities, lack of knowledge, privacy and identity theft, slow speed of internet and electricity failure are the problems for applying social media in libraries of Pakistan for marketing library resources and services. They demanded for trainings for social media usage and suggested that libraries should develop social media page for maximum exploitation of library services. Study recommends that libraries should develop their marketing plan for utilizing social media for news and service alerts and quick updates to online users and fund raising.

[snip]

Conclusion

It is plausible that respondent's behavior towards the use of social media for marketing library resources and services was positive. By using social media libraries can promote their users, services, resources, events and communication. Study concludes that according to the changing needs of library users, libraries need to be changed accordingly. Libraries should be facilitated with internet service and develop their web page and social media page. In order to grow social media usage trend in libraries of Pakistan, librarians should be trained and educated regarding social media use for marketing library resources and services and all the problems that hinder in social media usage in libraries should be resolved.

Cite:

Khan, Shakeel Ahmad, & Bhatti, Rubina (2012).   "Application of social media in marketing of library and information services: A case study from Pakistan."   Webology, 9(1), Article 93.

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://www.webology.org/2012/v9n1/a93.html]


Sunday, December 8, 2013

Library-Led Faculty Workshops: Helping Distance Educators Meet Information Literacy Goals in the Online Classroom

Abstract 

Library-Led Faculty Workshops: Helping Distance Educators Meet Information Literacy Goals in the Online ClassroomAt University of Maryland University College (UMUC), librarians have designed and led a number of multiday, asynchronous online workshops for faculty. The workshops teach faculty how to meet information literacy goals in the virtual classroom. Through hands-on activities and discussion among their colleagues, participants in the faculty workshops learn about the university's information literacy standards, library resources and services, free Web tools, and how best to design class assignments involving library research. Library-led faculty workshops at UMUC have increased library visibility and furthered collaboration between faculty and librarians. This article discusses 5 workshops, detailing workshop content and logistics and demonstrating how librarians can help distance faculty further information literacy goals for students.

[snip]

Conclusion

Library-led faculty workshops offer excellent opportunities to further a library's collaboration with individual faculty members, academic departments, and other units within the university. Workshops that raise distance educators’ awareness of a library's online resources and services, and that help faculty create classroom assignments that make the best use of those resources and services, ultimately help the university reach its information literacy goals for students.

Though designing and facilitating a workshop represents a significant time commitment on the part of the library, each workshop, once created, can be presented multiple times. The workshops, however, do not remain static: librarians update content as needed and make revisions to further enhance the participants’ experience in the workshops. Furthermore, an existing workshop can readily be adapted to another topic: for example, a workshop on information literacy in the natural sciences can be adapted to one on information literacy in psychology. With even a few successful workshops in place, a library can envision addressing any number of information-literacy related topics in faculty workshops.

Being able to offer workshops, as the UMUC library does, in partnership with a department like the Center for Teaching and Learning, gives library-led workshops a certain visibility and importance. However, smaller-scale, less formal library-led workshops, offered directly to an academic department, for example, or to interested university staff, can also be an effective means of outreach and building partnerships between a distance library and other entities within the university

Cite:

Library-Led Faculty Workshops: Helping Distance Educators Meet Information Literacy Goals in the Online Classroom Robert Miller, Edward O’Donnell, Neal Pomea, Joseph Rawson, Ryan Shepard, Cynthia Thomes /  Journal of Library Administration  / Vol. 50, Iss. 7-8 / 830-856/  2010

Source and (Free) Full Text Available At:

[http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01930826.2010.488977]

Presentation Available At:

[http://cdm16240.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15434coll5/id/1025/rec/14]

Educating the Educators: Outreach to the College of Education Distance Faculty and Native American Students

Abstract
Educating the EducatorsOutreach to the College of Education Distance Faculty and Native American Students
The focus of “Educating the Educators: Outreach to the College of Education Distance Faculty and Native American Students” is to examine and explore the relationship between the Library and the College of Education regarding provision and promotion of Library services to students and faculty taking and teaching classes virtually and at satellite campus and computer lab locations throughout the state. It will include an overview of the special challenges facing the Library in providing these services to a college that offers a large number of distance education classes, enrolls a large number of Native American students, and includes a majority of the institution's distance students and parttime distance faculty.

Cite: 

Educating the Educators: Outreach to the College of Education Distance Faculty and Native American Students /  Tina M. Adams, R. Sean Evans  /  Journal of Library Administration  / Vol. 41 /  Iss. 1-2 / 3-18 / 2004

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://gcls2.cmich.edu/conference/past_proceedings/11thOCLSCP.pdf]


Providing Off-Campus Library Services by “Team”: An Assessment

Abstract
Providing Off-Campus Library Services by “Team”An AssessmentIn contrast to many large academic libraries, Kansas State University (K-State) does not have a distance librarian. As a result, the Library Services Project Team (Team) was formed to take a fresh look at current library services for distance learners. Although the Team has been in place for over two years, and has implemented many changes, there was no mechanism for receiving formal feedback from students and faculty about these services. Because it is important to know whether services are being used, two librarians on the Team developed a Web-based survey targeted at distance faculty and students. This paper discusses the assessment project including development of the survey, the university approval process, use of an electronic in-house survey system, administration of the survey, and compilation and analysis of results.

Cite:

Marcia Stockham & Elizabeth Turtle (2004) Providing Off-Campus Library Services by “Team”, Journal of Library Administration, 41:3-4, 443-457

Source:

[http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1300/J111v41n03_09]

[No Known Open Access Version Available]

Thursday, December 5, 2013

Distance Education and Virtual Reference

Abstract

Texas A&M University Libraries has been testing virtual reference services since February 2004, but during the fall semester 2005, the Libraries began implementing and actively promoting the services to various target groups. Distance education students were identified as a primary target group for virtual reference services, and as of the fall semester 2005, approximately 1,600 students were enrolled in 190 distance education classes. This paper presents the Libraries plan for promoting virtual reference services to distance education students and faculty and for evaluating the plan.

[snip]

Conclusion

The Texas A&M University Libraries experience provides evidence that the implementation of an organized, cohesive marketing strategy can have a positive effect on the promotion of library services. But it also demonstrates the need for more systematic and quantitative analysis of the impact of marketing strategies. In particular, this study poses questions for further research: When should a marketing blitz take place? Should faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates be targeted at the same time or at staggered times throughout the academic year? Should a marketing campaign be repeated? How often? Long-term evaluation of user statistics is certain to offer more insight into the process of marketing library services.

Cite:

Distance Education and Virtual Reference / Karen I. MacDonald, Wyoma Vanduinkerken
Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning / Vol. 2, Iss. 4, 2006

Source and Full Text Available At:

[http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1030&context=univ_lib_facpub]